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The animals who changed their colors by Pascale Allamand

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Published by Lothrop, Lee & Shepard in New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Animals -- Fiction.,
  • Individuality -- Fiction.

Book details:

About the Edition

The polar bear, whale, tortoise, and two crocodiles try to imitate the parrot"s beautiful colors, only to discover how impractical they are.

Edition Notes

StatementPascale Allamand ; English version by Elizabeth Watson Taylor.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPZ7.A3987 An 1979
The Physical Object
Pagination[32] p. :
Number of Pages32
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL4399428M
ISBN 100688419003, 0688519008
LC Control Number79000196

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Buy The Animals Who Changed Their Colors by Pascale Allamand online at Alibris. We have new and used copies available, in 1 editions - starting at $ Shop Range: $ - $ Get this from a library! The animals who changed their colors. [Pascale Allamand] -- The polar bear, whale, tortoise, and two crocodiles try to imitate the parrot's beautiful colors, only to discover how impractical they are. THE ANIMALS WHO CHANGED THEIR COLOR. By. GET WEEKLY BOOK RECOMMENDATIONS: Email Address Subscribe. Tweet. KIRKUS REVIEW. A lesser, more than usually idiotic version of the old be-glad-you're-what-you are gambit. A polar bear sees a rainbow and decides it would be nice to ""change his white coat into a colored one."". out of 5 stars How did the Animals get their colors. Reviewed in the United States on February 7, Verified Purchase. A friend was looking for this book for her grand-daughter for Christmas but couldn't find it locally in a brick and mortar store. I found it easily for her on It was as described and shipped fast at a Reviews: 3.

Title: How The Animals Got Their Colors Author: Michael Rosen Illustrator: John Clementson Genre: Myth, Folklore Themes: Animals, Uniqueness Opening line/sentence: Coyote is a wild dog. He thinks he’s so cunning, so clever. Brief Book Summary: Using old myths and folktale stories passed down from long ago, Rosen explains how eight different animals got their colors and explains why they are /5(8).   The polar bear sees a rainbow in the sky and wishes he could be a different color. He shares his thoughts with a whale friend and the two of them decide to travel to a place where brightly colored animals live, so they can find out how they did it. Along their travels, they pick up a tortoise and two crocodiles who want to change their colors, too. Click to read more about How the Animals Got Their Colors: Animal Myths from Around the World by Michael Rosen. LibraryThing is a cataloging and social networking site for booklovers All about How the Animals Got Their Colors: Animal Myths from Around the World by Michael s: 1.   Animals and their colors camouflage, warning coloration, courtship and territorial display, mimicry This edition published in by Crown in New York.

The Colours of Animals is a zoology book written in by Sir Edward Bagnall Poulton (–). It was the first substantial textbook to argue the case for Darwinian selection applying to all aspects of animal book also pioneered the concept of frequency-dependent selection and introduced the term "aposematism".. The book begins with a brief account of the physical causes. Buy How the Animals Got Their Colors: Animal Myths from Around the World by Michael Rosen, J. Clementson (Illustrator), Marcia Rosen online at Alibris. We have new and used copies available, in 0 edition - starting at. Shop now. Some animals can change their coat or skin to adapt to their environment. Matt Sampson has the story on these amazing animals. Animal coloration has been a topic of interest and research in biology for centuries. In the classical era, Aristotle recorded that the octopus was able to change its coloration to match its background, and when it was alarmed.. In his book Micrographia, Robert Hooke describes the "fantastical" (structural, not pigment) colors of the Peacock's feathers.